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Next Labour Leader

May 3, 2007
2,264
0
63
Liskeard, Cornwall
It is an incredible situation.

After a massive defeat by the PLP (170-40 or thereabouts) he will of course face a leadership challenge. But the members organised so that 10,000 showed up in P Square with very little notice to support him last night, and over 200,000 people have indicated they will vote for him in the leadership contest, which means (I think...) he would win it again.

So, as with the Tory leadership, as with the Brexit face off with the EU, someone has to blink.

A gargantuan re-arrangement of the recliners on all decks of the Titanic.
 
A

andyr1963

Guest
Corbyn has lost the Vote of Confidence 172 - 40

A huge civil war for the Labour Party as well as the Tories?

Perhaps the MP's would like the membership to quietly forget what a massive backing they gave him recently.

Is any MP going to be brave enough to create a new party "New Labour" perhaps in a Blairite tradition and cause a proper split?
After all, many of them were "selected" without consultation of the Membership.

Interesting times to say the least.

Cmon Jeremy, stick it up em sideways. :scarf:
 
Apr 15, 2008
4,061
0
London
Green Rhino":1yp21w91 said:
It is an incredible situation.

After a massive defeat by the PLP (170-40 or thereabouts) he will of course face a leadership challenge. But the members organised so that 10,000 showed up in P Square with very little notice to support him last night, and over 200,000 people have indicated they will vote for him in the leadership contest, which means (I think...) he would win it again.

So, as with the Tory leadership, as with the Brexit face off with the EU, someone has to blink.

A gargantuan re-arrangement of the recliners on all decks of the Titanic.

I was in Westminster last night, Rhino (walk past it on my way home), and seriously no way was there 10,000 people there... there was 600 if that.
 
Sep 30, 2004
1,035
0
Quinny":210yf5fn said:
I like JC's political stance, but if the stories coming out over the weekend are true that he and his team intentionally torpedoed the Labour #Remain campaign (and there is plenty of evidence to suggest he did) then he can eff off. I had my suspicions about him as (a) his personal views on the EU was well known; (b) was pretty much anonymous for most of the referendum campaign; (c) when he was finally dragged out into public for the #Remain fight, refused to share a platform with any of the Tories and, rather than put up a fight for the EU, decided to spend his time attacking the US/EU TTIP agreement. I decided he wasn't the right person to lead the party anymore when I listened to him on the radio on Friday morning when he sounded like ... like ... a politician, giving preset, ambiguous answers to the result: disappointed, well fought campaign, up to the PM as to when to activate Article 50, blah, blah, blah. He couldn't have sounded more uninterested in the whole affair if he tried. He should have been effing fuming over the result: he should have been laying into Cameron/Osborne as any half-effective opposition leader would have done. Probably the most emotional response about the result came from Tim bloody Farron (remember him? Leader of the LibDems?)

I had a FB conversation with a friend of mine over the weekend (he's very pro-Corbyn) and I pretty much decided that, as much as I agree with much of Corbyn's politics and it being great that there is a true left-leaning leader of the Labour Party, I feel he isn't the person to take the party forward. I would happily accept a life of living in opposition in Parliament if Corbyn and Labour harried, fought, and made life miserable as hell for the Tories in every Bill they put towards the House. But they don't. Labour should be creaming the Tories in the opinion polls, but they aren't. I know Corbyn is popular with grass-roots Labour members, but is the party any better off now than it was a year or so ago? No. If anything it has gone backwards. Even his school-teacher approach to PMQ is starting to irritate the hell out of me.

When he took over, nearly all the 'big guns' in the Labour Party refused to support him or work in his Cabinet and slinked off to the back-benches, leaving Corbyn no option other than to pick a second-string Cabinet (bar probably Hilary Benn). Now most of those have buggered off, meaning Corbyn has to scour the back-benches to find people to fill those places. Will they be any more effective as an opposition party? No.

So TL;DR - Corbyn has to go. I want an effective opposition: I want a Labour Party with a realistic chance of winning an election. You won't get either under Corbyn. And his performance and approach to the referendum is unforgivable in my eyes.

Sounds like you need somebody who can unite the middle ground of politics...somebody in the style of Tony Blair he won 3 elections I believe. :D
 
Oct 6, 2005
1,019
0
Winchester
As I said, the rossers said 10k, the Mail 4K. I reckon somewhere between that. Anyway, that's by the by. The point really is that I believe the PLP have completely miscalculated how the rest of the party feel. Angela Eagle's own CLP sent her a memo asking her to support Corbyn! How out of touch.
 
Jul 3, 2014
101
0
49
Bere Alston
The thing is whilst most of the Labour parties membership seem to support him they need to make a decision do they want a leader they like from the left, or someone more to the centre who can actually appeal to the bulk of the voting public to win an election?
 
Jul 15, 2006
3,892
56
Kenton, Devon
Unless Corbyn does the right thing for the party and resigns, if he decided to stick his ground and is elected again, then I'll put money on there being a split in the Labour party (SDP mk2), and Labour probably won't have a look-in in the next couple of General Elections (and if they don't split, Labour will never be in power with Corbyn at the helm).
 
Oct 6, 2005
1,019
0
Winchester
Tamar Raider":1arq92ly said:
The thing is whilst most of the Labour parties membership seem to support him they need to make a decision do they want a leader they like from the left, or someone more to the centre who can actually appeal to the bulk of the voting public to win an election?
But with people abandoning the centre ground all over the shop why on earth would you do that. People are turned off by centrists in grey suits, look at the rise of the SNP and UKIP. If Labour can tap into that then electoral success will come.
 
Jul 15, 2006
3,892
56
Kenton, Devon
Cameron has crossed one of those unwritten rules of the House by telling Corbyn to go ... and probably did nothing more than make Corbyn even less likely to resign.